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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. li
obviously focus on is china. in september, they approved infrastructure projects. love the way the stocking is acting the last couple of days. dagen: you are bullish on the global economy. charles: for a while now. connell: you are not worried about china athol? charles: i think china is going to continue to be on a roll. i am also impressed with brazil, indonesia and turkey. the rest of the world really doing extraordinarily well. connell: we like when you go global on us, charles. what do you use, google maps or apple? charles: stuart varney is probably better than me when it comes to these smart phones. connell: i do remember when you got away from the flip phone. charles: that is only because i left it in the green room. i heard someone from the smithsonian came up. dagen: charles, thank you so much. connell: let's go to this google graphic story. it is a very popular app. let's put it that way. we will talk about that coming up. more from washington, the house speaker ready to put through his own legislation. >> our hope continues to be to reach an agreement with the president what we
vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. to keep the factories going. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker and kissinger initially, and then volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the rese
constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have
, who was a sea captain, and he brought them in in the '60s, early '60s. he was going out to china, presumably. yeah, to shanghai, mainly. tell you what, he had a good eye. he could have bought real rubbish, but he didn't. these are actually very nice paintings. right. the chinese, for a couple of thousand years had this fantastic system whereby if you wanted to get on in life, you took exams and you could be the humblest peasant and if you passed your three exams you were made for life. and the exams were not like our "a" levels or anything like that. it was serious stuff. i mean, it was you know, big time. and mostly after you passed your exams you would progress through the civil service. a very few got through the exams and said "i'm gonna drop out. "i don't want to be an administrator. "i want to go out into the landscape and right poetry. i want to paint paintings." and these were the literati, and this is the sort of thing that they did. and what's fascinating about this is we've got here, effectively, the table on which you did your scrolls. i've neve
? >> by the way, on that china point, wind energy relies on precious metals, rare either metals and china is the chief production of that. some analysts say we'll be more reliant as we go more and more wind power, more reliant on the chinese mining industry to get rare earth metals that we need, rare earth metals. sandra: what are we doing here? the taxpayers have got to question this. this is their hard-earned dollars at work. the vetting process by the obama administration has not been all that great when investing in these companies. >> no. we've seen 80% of companies had ties with democratic donors with obama, connections, cronyism. wind produces 2.3% of the electricity. 1.3% of the global electricity. this is something that is, this was the, energy of the future back in the 1970s, 35 years ago. and it hasn't produced. every year they extend, not every year but extend the production tax credits for the wind power and the bottom line is, the wind power, always say prosperity is just around the corner. self-reliance is just around the corner. it doesn't happen. whoo we're seeing more an
to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going out the long term in the future. so the $1 trillion in savings is money we would not have spent anyway. there are some built-in drawdowns in the defense department. in.se were built an about $487 billion over 10 years. they are coming back down. about 100,000 or so and they are built into the system. the pentagon is looking at things that way. host: roger in texas, republican caller. go ahead. caller: i am amazed i got thr
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
market news, a lot of talk about china this morning. a final reading of hsbc's manufacturing purchasing manager's survey for china rising in november, first time above the key 50 mark which indicates expanding rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens
's amazing were no other cars in the tunnel. that tunnel connects china town and russian hill. it has a 35-mile an hour speed limit. san francisco supervisor said that the police chief told him police are investigating the video. >> i think no mat wore it is its offensive, it violates public safety. >> reporter: the officer involvede mailed us to tell his side of the story and he said he wasn't driving 100 miles an hour and that he was not drunk. he said my biggest mistake was putting this video on facebook. this was meant to be between friends, i find it upsetting that someone would put the time and energy into finding a three month old innocent video and alert the media to its presence, drawing a line from innocent fun to police misconduct. that posting of that video has been removed and apparently a police investigation now underway. >> thank you. time is now 7:33. police in san leandro searching for the man who stole a truck and then crashed into a fence. it was stolen from the sheet worker's union building last night about 8:15. a gps system in the truck helped the police find it. i
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
with china as they grow. got to deal with the terrorists, and we've got to manage the circumstances in the middle east. so people in washington and the foreign affairs business are going to be very, very busy. iran, syria, israel, the palestinians, a new constitution in egypt, and all around the periphery of the middle east there are still terrorist elements. and there's a problem in north africa with terrorists. >> and i was also going to add to the conversation north korea. >> that's right. >> you heard the news today, they say they have a missile that could potentially reach the united states. of course it could be weaponized. what's your reaction to that? >> well, we've known this was coming for a long time and we have a missile defense program, a rudimentary program, but it's been in place, put it in place several years ago, and it's designed specifically to handle this. actually we're ahead on that. but they've been relentless bad boys. no matter how difficult their domestic situation is, they've always seemed to find the resources to military power and threatening neighbors a
vacuum cleaner. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the recession by cutting, cutting, -- entering into recession because they are imposing austerity on themselves, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came over. but if you are the united states of america and there are certain other factors that i will touch upon later, what you can do is you can expand your defici
.o. of big caterpillar equipment and talk about what's going on in china and i hope we get back to that. you're right that's all we're talking about instead of talking about caterpillar and what you do well as a great company. >> thank you. again, every time i come to the floor it's the hub of our greatness in this country of business. it's why we're here. it's really fun and exciting and let answer get into '13 and get into real things. i'm with you, joe. >> i know, but this deal has to play in peoria. >> it will play. >> compared to what you got in illinois now anything looks good. thanks. >> okay. >>> the executive chef tpz at jpmorgan the bank naming two chief officers to oversee things like anti-moneying. kayla tausche joins us. >> the person to watch everyone watching is looking at jez staly, he was chairman as of july largely viewed as a swank song role that rivals have taken note of. there were discussions over the ceo at legg mason, the baltimore asset manager. the talks fell apart and staly was the top of the short list for the board and recruiters after being serious talks for the
short-term debt, not long-term debt because of huge interest rate disc over time. if you look at china in particular, they are now looking at corporate bonds and alternative investments within u.s. treasury securities because they don't like what they see and understandably so. so we are living on borrowed time. we've created another bubble in my view is the reason the fed is doing a kissimmee and it was changed to where they have to be concerned with short-term employment. in the absence of the deck unsustainable over time. >> the most successful fiscal consolidations in the developed democratic world occurred in canada in the mid-1990s. i frankly asked canadian politicians, how did she do it? because the public wind from cheering on spending two and a set deficits within a matter of a year or two so that governments in canada now with some peril if they don't balance the budget. the answer you most frequently to do so they have to do was say that 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill and the canadian debt. the public immediately realized i was not a great idea and became
even have to consider borrowing money from china or anywhere else and we're worried about a a.a.a. credit rating. why should we even have that as an option? we're the richest country in the world, and we put food out everywhere. also, one brief note on the gun laws issue. they're not going to ban a particular type of car because it drove through a crowd. so i don't see how they can target any particular weapon and say it's worse than another. combat loading weapon, you can almost do that as fast as you can pull the trigger also. so it's not a matter of how many rounds you can shoot. it's a matter of an insane person getting a hold of anything -- a knife, a car, anything. so -- guest: keith, and the reality of using guns for whatever illegal purposes oftentimes gets lost into washington, d.c. and the politics. boy, we're going to have to do something. we are going to have a press release, a press conference. there is a second amendment. thankfully the supreme court has recognized it is an individual right and a narrow decision. the one thing i want to go back, small business th
sachs to buy from neutral. citing increased potential for yum's operations in china. although, that's what we talk about all the time. kfc in china. that's the growth in their, i think isn't yum bigger than mcdonald's in terms of total number? >> yeah. >> i think subway is, too. research -- >> they don't even call it kentucky tried anymore. >> kfc. >> and it's really chicken. >> that's uncalled for. what do you think it is, cat? that is uncalled for. >> this is all i'll say. >> tastes like chicken. >> yes, it's chicken! if david novak -- >> taco bell. >> yeah, taco bell. >> is that really meat? is that your next -- >> no. all right. the restaurant -- research in motion, rim shares coming off a seven-month high on news that the u.s. immigrations and customs enforcement agent are going to use the blackberry 10 on a trial basis. that is on news, did you see this, that the agency is going to ditch the iphone in favor -- >> okay, so why? >> i don't know. i just want to say, so blackberry was one of the sponsors of the thing yesterday, at the dealbook conference and they showed off the bl
canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecologically that were not good for the earth's, things that people did to maximize profits. so, that is one thing. is there the possibility there might be a new economy that is not based on growth? second, if you do not have consumer demand at the same level that he used to -- and of course, i think that is why. one of the piece
look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be concerned with unemployment. we need a fiscal deal. the fed has to change its policy because both are imprudent and unsustainable over time. >> right. >> one of the most successful physical consolidations in the developed, democratic world in canada, in the mid 1990's, and i ask the canadian politicians how did you do it? the public went from cheering on spending to deficits within a matter of a year or two. the government in canada now risks some peril if they do not balance their budget. the answer you most frequently get is all they had to do was say, 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill on the canadian debt, and the public immediately realized that was not a great idea. we cannot make that argument. we run these massive deficits and because inter
to -- of china chance is progress to if there was one district name in changing the health and when people said the but the time from cover to,. it was a two session time. what they really meant was that they scanned it things they have read a yesterday. it was the reliable place to go. all of the news fit to print. it was a very important -- it was a very important part of history. let's take the normandy invasion in 1944, a major historic event. you remember -- most of us do not remember that, but if you think of that, could he should the map of the allies' progress? at the end of the thirties. horace. the crimes a point of departure, to make sure they have full reporters, that the most accurate news was really in the newspaper. the great news reporters could do so much. so it really was not the place for people to go to the news. i want to stress something else out. at that time, the government and the media were aligned. there was not this junction that we have now. it was not fox fees. there was not a gap that will come to later. i wanted to become the new media and administration was clos
about how china is taking over. what we need to make some decisions that is going to help the america people, corporate america, middle-class america, those individuals that are not in the capacity whatever so ever, i expect our elected officials to getting together, work this thing out, do the right thing, quit the fighting and come up with a solution even if they have to go back after the fact and just get things the way they are supposed to be. >> some of the expectations there from willard. we're going to go on to cal on the republicans line in tennessee. what do you think of the fiscal cliff and where the negotiations are so far? >> i think they ought to go over the fiscal cliff. we have people like that that are on the government bill too long. they are sucking the tit of the federal government. i think everyone should pay their fair share. we have almost a $17 billion national debt. not only, the rich but everyone should pay their fair share. we also need some spending cuts too. $3 for every $1. if you don't do this we're going top find ourselfs in a situation -- you want to ta
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)